KEY WEST WILDLIFE CENTER

The Key West Wildlife Center is a 501(c)(3) charitable tax exempt organization. We provide care to over 1000 native animals a year. Our mission is to ensure the future of our diverse native wildlife by providing timely rescues and quality rehabilitation with the hope of release back to the wild."
Join us for this Round Robin Tennis Benefit to the Key West Wildlife Center!

Join us for this Round Robin Tennis Benefit to the Key West Wildlife Center!

This juvenile Laughing Gull was rescued by a tourist visiting Smathers Beach in Key West April 18th. The gull had been waterlogged after being knocked in the water and drifted into shore where the tourist rescued it and gave us a call. The bird was extremely dehydrated and weak upon admittance and could not stand. It has been making great improvements since and is standing and eating on its own now. It should be ready for release back to the wild soon…

This juvenile Laughing Gull was rescued by a tourist visiting Smathers Beach in Key West April 18th. The gull had been waterlogged after being knocked in the water and drifted into shore where the tourist rescued it and gave us a call. The bird was extremely dehydrated and weak upon admittance and could not stand. It has been making great improvements since and is standing and eating on its own now. It should be ready for release back to the wild soon…

It is that time of year again! White-crowned Pigeons are visiting the Sonny McCoy Indigenous Park! We have had a lot of birding activity in the park this Spring! The following species have been sighted in the park lately: Indigo Bunting, Scarlet Tanager, Summer Tanager, Swainson’s Thrush; Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Black-and-white Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Worm-eating Warbler, White-crowned Pigeon, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Kentucky Warbler, Wood Thrush, Veery, and Ovenbird.

It is that time of year again! White-crowned Pigeons are visiting the Sonny McCoy Indigenous Park! We have had a lot of birding activity in the park this Spring! The following species have been sighted in the park lately:
Indigo Bunting, Scarlet Tanager, Summer Tanager, Swainson’s Thrush; Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Black-and-white Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Worm-eating Warbler, White-crowned Pigeon, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Kentucky Warbler, Wood Thrush, Veery, and Ovenbird.

Rescues 4/17

Rescues 4/17: Ovenbird @ Bertha/Flagler stunned from impact (released); Sora from “Island Time” Sunset Key Ferry stunned from impact (released); Laughing Gull with wing injury @ Ibis Bay; Northern Mockingbird stunned from impact @ Whitehead and Amelia (released); 2 Mourning Doves rescued at Murray Marine; 1 Double-crested Cormorant rescued at Smathers Beach. Thanks to volunteers Liza, Anne, Bill, Jordan, Jason, Nadine and Miss Loretta for helping so much today!

This juvenile Brown Pelican was rescued this morning after a call from the 2400 block of Linda Avenue in Key West. The homeowner had noticed it last night in his yard and when it did not leave this morning, he called us. We were able to make the rescue and determine this youngster is weak, cold and dehydrated. Fluids were administered and it was tucked away on a heating pad to begin recovery…

This juvenile Brown Pelican was rescued this morning after a call from the 2400 block of Linda Avenue in Key West. The homeowner had noticed it last night in his yard and when it did not leave this morning, he called us. We were able to make the rescue and determine this youngster is weak, cold and dehydrated. Fluids were administered and it was tucked away on a heating pad to begin recovery…

4/15: We are happy to partner with Florida Keys Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center in getting this Brown Booby released back to the wild! FKWBRC rescued and rehabilitated this Booby and transported it to the Key West Wildlife Center so we could help get it back to the wild. Thanks to all involved. We will post pictures from the release!
4/16: Happy to report the release of a Brown Booby this morning in partnership with Florida Keys Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center. FKWBRC did a great job rehabilitating the bird. Its feathers were in great condition and it quickly flew directly South towards the Marquesas just after this shot was taken. Thanks to all involved!

The Double-crested Cormorant rescued at Geiger Key Marina with multiple swallowed fishing hooks was able to be released after successful removal of internal hooks on 4/10. The release was at Boca Chica Beach.

We were able to release four Brown Pelicans at Boca Chica Beach on 4/10 after rehabilitating them at our center. We are very happy to get them back to the wild in time for their migration. We are still providing care to 9 Brown Pelicans and are looking to get them released in time to travel!

We were able to rescue this juvenile Brown pelican last evening from the 3000 block of 5th Avenue on Stock Island. Two separate callers helped us locate the bird, which is dehydrated and weak. It was administered fluids and tucked away to begin recovery towards release.

We were able to rescue this juvenile Brown pelican last evening from the 3000 block of 5th Avenue on Stock Island. Two separate callers helped us locate the bird, which is dehydrated and weak. It was administered fluids and tucked away to begin recovery towards release.

This American Kestrel was rescued by someone headed into work at Truman Annex Base and brought to the Eco Discovery Center where we were able to pick it up. It has a wing injury that is treatable and we look forward to rehabilitating it and releasing it back to the wild.

It must be baby bird season! Thanks to Judi Bradford for making us baby bird feeding masks! These masks help us provide care to baby birds without having them imprint on us and have the best chance of making it on their own once they are released back to the wild!

It must be baby bird season! Thanks to Judi Bradford for making us baby bird feeding masks! These masks help us provide care to baby birds without having them imprint on us and have the best chance of making it on their own once they are released back to the wild!

This Summer Tanager was rescued from 6th Street on Stock Island after suffering the effects of an impact. With rehabilitative time and rest, we hope to return this beautiful bird to the wild.

This Summer Tanager was rescued from 6th Street on Stock Island after suffering the effects of an impact. With rehabilitative time and rest, we hope to return this beautiful bird to the wild.

Thanks to volunteer Shane Craig for helping prepare the old Navy building 103 at Truman Waterfront for the upcoming Least Tern nesting season! The terns should begin nesting soon on the roof and the netting along the sides keeps the chicks from falling off…

Just got a call from local Ginny who saw a Brown Pelican walk past her on the sidewalk in the 6600 block of Maloney Avenue on Stock Island. Ginny was concerned about the bird and we were able to make the rescue with her help during a downpour just a little while ago. The juvenile male Brown Pelican is dehydrated and weak, but does not have any outward injuries. It has been given fluids and tucked away on a heating pad to rest. Thanks to all those looking out for our native wildlife!

Just got a call from local Ginny who saw a Brown Pelican walk past her on the sidewalk in the 6600 block of Maloney Avenue on Stock Island. Ginny was concerned about the bird and we were able to make the rescue with her help during a downpour just a little while ago. The juvenile male Brown Pelican is dehydrated and weak, but does not have any outward injuries. It has been given fluids and tucked away on a heating pad to rest. Thanks to all those looking out for our native wildlife!

The Brown Pelican rescued March 29th with a severely torn pouch that we initially stapled together to line up and begin healing was evaluated, trimmed and sutured today by Dr. Gerry Diethelm of Marathon Veterinary Hospital. Prognosis is good for a complete recovery. Thank you Dr. Gerry!

The Brown Pelican rescued March 29th with a severely torn pouch that we initially stapled together to line up and begin healing was evaluated, trimmed and sutured today by Dr. Gerry Diethelm of Marathon Veterinary Hospital. Prognosis is good for a complete recovery. Thank you Dr. Gerry!