KEY WEST WILDLIFE CENTER

The Key West Wildlife Center is a 501(c)(3) charitable tax exempt organization. We provide care to over 1000 native animals a year. Our mission is to ensure the future of our diverse native wildlife by providing timely rescues and quality rehabilitation with the hope of release back to the wild."
The Green Heron rescued with a broken left Tibiotarsis and Fibula by the United States Coast Guard at Truman Annex in Key West on 9/25 is recovering. It has responded well to having its leg set while the fracture heals. We look forward to returning this heron to the wild and thanks to all those looking out for our native wildlife in distress! Thanks also to volunteers Gary and Lucy who provided aviary help and Susan who is releasing a juvenile Brown Pelican this afternoon!

The Green Heron rescued with a broken left Tibiotarsis and Fibula by the United States Coast Guard at Truman Annex in Key West on 9/25 is recovering. It has responded well to having its leg set while the fracture heals. We look forward to returning this heron to the wild and thanks to all those looking out for our native wildlife in distress! Thanks also to volunteers Gary and Lucy who provided aviary help and Susan who is releasing a juvenile Brown Pelican this afternoon!

Thanks to Raysi Hernandez and Tanner Jinks for rescuing this gorgeous Northern Parula on the sidewalk outside of Champs Sports on North Roosevelt in Key West. They found the migratory bird after it struck a window and held it until we arrived. It has already recovered and has been released to continue on its migratory path! Thanks to all those looking out for wildlife in distress!

This Ovenbird was rescued after a window strike at Southernmost on the Beach in Key West this morning. It is recovering and will be released back to the wild so it can continue its migratory journey….

This Ovenbird was rescued after a window strike at Southernmost on the Beach in Key West this morning. It is recovering and will be released back to the wild so it can continue its migratory journey….

This female Anhinga was rescued from Paula Street in Key West last evening standing in the road. The bird is molting and cannot fly temporarily. It has been released by Volunteer Liza in a safer area near to where it was found this afternoon.The word Anhinga comes from the Brazilian Tupi language and means devil bird or snake bird.

This female Anhinga was rescued from Paula Street in Key West last evening standing in the road. The bird is molting and cannot fly temporarily. It has been released by Volunteer Liza in a safer area near to where it was found this afternoon.The word Anhinga comes from the Brazilian Tupi language and means devil bird or snake bird.

This White-crowned Pigeon was rescued by residents of Big Coppitt Key who saw it in distress in their yard, unable to fly. The White-crowned Pigeon has a shoulder injury and has been stabilized and wrapped for rehabilitation. Thanks for all those looking out for our local wildlife in distress!

This White-crowned Pigeon was rescued by residents of Big Coppitt Key who saw it in distress in their yard, unable to fly. The White-crowned Pigeon has a shoulder injury and has been stabilized and wrapped for rehabilitation. Thanks for all those looking out for our local wildlife in distress!

The Brown Noddy rescued September 1st on the South Roosevelt Sea wall in Key West has been released! Thanks to everyone involved with the rescue, rehabilitation and release of this amazing bird!

This Ovenbird was rescued Sunday after a window strike in Old Town Key West. After rehabilitation, Animal Care Director Peggy released it in the Indigenous Park so it can continue on its migratory path…

Thanks to Save a Turtle org. Volunteers for rescuing these two Loggerhead Turtle hatchlings after excavating what could be our last Loggerhead nest of the season! They were discovered in the nest and brought to the Key West Wildlife Center. We were able to release them last evening. Thanks to everyone looking out for our native wildlife and thanks to Save-A-Turtle nesting surveyors for working hard through another nesting season!

Thanks to Save a Turtle org. Volunteers for rescuing these two Loggerhead Turtle hatchlings after excavating what could be our last Loggerhead nest of the season! They were discovered in the nest and brought to the Key West Wildlife Center. We were able to release them last evening. Thanks to everyone looking out for our native wildlife and thanks to Save-A-Turtle nesting surveyors for working hard through another nesting season!

This Chuck-will’s-widow was rescued this evening on Big Coppitt Key with a wing injury that has been set and wrapped. Outlook is very good for recovery and release. The Chuck-will ‘s-widow hunts actively at night by flying low over the ground in search of insects. Occasionally, small birds and bats are included in its diet. We include the Richard Nilson illustration of the large scooping mouth without stressing our patient to show one of the unique birds interesting features.

Bette Zirkelbach's Photos - Bette Zirkelbach | Facebook

Thanks for the updates on the Loggerhead Turtle we helped rescue!

This juvenile Florida Box Turtle was rescued by one of our volunteers, Dell, who was working cleaning pools this morning. It was floating in the pool of a residence right around the corner from our center. We will release it in the Indigenous Park since this is most likely where the turtle originated. It is very important to release rescued turtles near to where they were found. They have to be released in their home territory or it can cause them to become disoriented and vulnerable.

This juvenile Florida Box Turtle was rescued by one of our volunteers, Dell, who was working cleaning pools this morning. It was floating in the pool of a residence right around the corner from our center. We will release it in the Indigenous Park since this is most likely where the turtle originated. It is very important to release rescued turtles near to where they were found. They have to be released in their home territory or it can cause them to become disoriented and vulnerable.

Thanks to everyone involved in today’s Loggerhead Turtle Rescue: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; The Turtle Hospital, and Save a Turtle org. Thanks to all of the organizations for partnering with the Key West Wildlife Center in order to get this turtle rescued from an entanglement that had it dragging a crab trap from its front right flipper. Thanks to Mike Hentz for the great pictures! We appreciate everyone’s efforts. Save-A-Turtle volunteers Niki Harcourt and Marlene Durazo were very helpful while Alastair from The Turtle Hospital got to the scene as well! This shows what rescue organizations can do when partnering together!

Thanks to everyone involved in today’s Loggerhead Turtle Rescue: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation CommissionThe Turtle Hospital, and Save a Turtle org. Thanks to all of the organizations for partnering with the Key West Wildlife Center in order to get this turtle rescued from an entanglement that had it dragging a crab trap from its front right flipper. Thanks to Mike Hentz for the great pictures! We appreciate everyone’s efforts. Save-A-Turtle volunteers Niki Harcourt and Marlene Durazo were very helpful while Alastair from The Turtle Hospital got to the scene as well! This shows what rescue organizations can do when partnering together!

keywestwildlifecenter:

Got a call from Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission this morning regarding a large Loggerhead Turtle possibly in distress in the waters off of White Street Pier in Key West. We were able to determine that the turtle was struggling and that it could have an entanglement issue on the right front flipper. At that point, Alastair of The Turtle Hospital responded from Marathon while staff from the Key West Wildlife Center and Save a Turtle org. kept an eye on it. Once Alastair arrived, he was able to kayak and snorkle out to discover the turtle was entangled in fishing line and nylon rope around the right front flipper. The line was attached to a crab trap and was being dragged by the turtle. Thankfully we were able to enlist the help of one of our volunteers with a boat to make the rescue. Alastair got the turtle in a net and we were able to get it aboard safely. We were able to transport it to Hurricane Hole marina where it was transferred to the Turtle Ambulance. It has now arrived in Marathon for treatment. Thanks to everyone involved! It is always great to partner with other rescue organizations and FWC to try and save the lives of our native wildlife in distress!